Best Knife Sharpening Tools…The Ones I Have

My Professional Knife Sharpening Tools…

If you’ve read My Best Butchers Knives post, then you might have a question about what are my professional knife sharpening tools? Below are details of the my butchers sharpening tools that I currently have in my work place. A Sharpening Steel and Sharpening Stone will last a long time as long as they are cleaned regularly and kept safely in a proper knife storage canvas roll. I have details of mine below as well.

My Sharpening Steel…

F Dick Sharpening Steels

Dick 12″ Dickoron Sapphire Cut Sharpening Steel: Ovalf-dick-steel

  • High-quality MADE IN GERMANY – Friedr. Dick Germany, traditionally better since 1778
  • Wear resistant surface with break proof, tough core.
  • Efficient surface protection thanks to galvanic coating.
  • Safety through high quality fittings. Ergonomically formed and attractive handles.
  • Oval shape for more sharpening purchase on knife when drawing down.

It keeps a razor edge on all my knives. As long as you have a pretty sharp edge to begin with you won’t have to take you knife to a sharpening stone as often.

My Sharpening Stone…

HornTide 3000/8000 Grit Combination Whetstone Two-Sided Knife Sharpener 7-Inch Sharpening Stone

  • TWO-IN-ONE – This stone is equipped with a #3000 grit side for rough sharpening and a #8000 grit side forhorntide-sharpening-stone
    fine finish sharpening and honing.
  • PROFESSIONAL QUALITY – This two-in-one stone is made from professional grade Corundum (Aluminum Oxide) to give you even and consistent sharpening.
  • VERSATILITY – Perfect for the beginner or advanced knife handler, in the home, restaurant, butcher shop or outdoor adventure.
  • NON-SLIP PLASTIC BASE – Included is plastic base which holds your stone in place while sharpening and ergonomically positions your stone off the counter for ease of use.
  • EASY TO USE – Never used a whetstone before? No problem, see the image to quickly and easily teach you the sharpening methods
    and techniques to sharpen like a pro!
  • Oil is NOT required; water actually works better.stone-sharpening-instructions

Now, when you sharpen your knives on the stone you always use the rough side first to grind the blade back down to remove any chips or edges. Instead of just using water, I use water with dish washing detergent. This helps keep the stone pores free of fat and grease. Fat and grease build up on the stone surface hinders the sharpening process. If you feel the stone not grabbing the blade it means the stone needs a clean. You can run it under really hot water or pour some mentholated spirits on the stone and continue the sharpening. You will certainly feel the blade grab the stone then.

Once the blade edge feels sharper then you turn the stone over and use the fine side for honing the blade. Honing will
make the blade very sharp and may even produce iron burrs on the blade. If that happens, use the steel to knock the burrs off the knife edge but don’t rub too hard on the steel. Gently slide the knife down the steel.

Once sharp, clean your knife with hot water and run the knife through a piece of paper. Hold the paper up and run the knife through from the heel of the blade through to the tip. If the knife is sharp it will glide through easily. If not, then back to the honing stone again. Butchers sometimes test the sharpness by seeing if they can shave the hairs from their arm. Next time you go into a butcher shop look at the butchers arm to see if one has more hair than the other :-)).

Now for the storage carry case, I don’t use one all the time because I store my knives in my knife pouch which is on a belt that goes around my waist. You don’t need this but if you are going to spend your money on good knives you should store them in a good case.

When I do meat training or cutting demos at different venues, I use my

Messermeister Padded Knife Roll with 8 Pockets

for carrying my knives around.

  •  This Messermeister padded knife roll is made of a durable 600D polyester fabric  and highest quality metalmessermeister-knife-carry-case zippers.
  • Holds 8 knives and sharpening Steele up to an  overall length of 18 inches.
  • Comfortable carry case handle
  • Protection case for knives.
  • Excellent for anyone on the move and needs to carry the essential knives and tools.
  • Dimensions when open is 50.8L x 15.3W x 3.9D.
  • Comes in a variety colour choices

When you have finished using your knives this is the best place to store them to protect from scratching and chipping the blades and also keep them in a safe place from accidental cutting if stored in the kitchen cutlery draw.

Well, these are the professional knife sharpening tools that I use in my butchering day. I highly recommend them and suggest if you want to cut meat or use in your kitchen, get yourself these tools that I use. They will keep your knives sharp and if handled carefully will last a very long time.

Let me know what you think when you buy them….

Thanks and enjoy your meat cutting… John

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4 comments

  1. Linda says:

    Great information! Dull knives are more dangerous than sharp ones. They can slip off of what you are cutting and then cut you. We are much easier to slice!
    Nice site. I am bookmarking so I can return often.

    • John says:

      Hi Linda, thanks for visiting my site. Yes you’re right, when you use a dull knife you put more pressure on what you are cutting and if you slip and cut yourself they are always deeper and longer. I know as I have had my fair share of cuts during my time as a butcher. Thanks for bookmarking and I will be adding more helpful hints along the way.
      Thanks John

  2. Dennis | knifesharpenerguy says:

    Outstanding blog, thanks very much.Your advice is very helpful, covering all the basic info and adding a lot of deeper insight that even many knife enthusiasts probably didn’t know.Always good to hear from a true expert.

    • John says:

      Hi Dennis, thanks for your comments and glad you enjoyed my article. Yes a few years of experience in these words I can assure you. Thanks for dropping by. John

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